Opportunities for Teachers with NOAA

Internships, summer experiences, workshops, conferences and online activities – if you teach any weather, climate, or geography you should consider bookmarking this site and checking it regularly!    There are even free courses that carry graduate credit.    http://www.education.noaa.gov/Educator_Opportunities/#page=All 

Project WILD

Project WILD – one of the most-used sets of environmental education curricula in the US. grades K-8 with some flexibility in the grade levels. You can’t buy the materials – it’s given to you when you attend in one-day (or more) workshop. You get the books while the actual materials are simple and cheap.

Don’s hint – get a plastic bin for each activity you will use and keep it pre-loaded with all of the things, be they paper towels, paper clips, whatever.  Add a few empty trash bags and a photocopy of the exercise and the teacher’s hints.  Then you can just grab and run.

A lot of learning about conservation, environmental and ecological principles can be taught through games and activities.  Project WILD and its companion, Project WET serve to provide the teacher with dozens of such activities that have been teacher-written, then teacher-tested, and revised so that they just simply work.  Most are keyed to objectives.  Read more at http://www.projectwild.org/

One more thing – here a free sample lesson.  It’s for young children, and it’s about how fish use their bodies when they swim.  http://www.projectwild.org/GrowingUpWILD.htm and click on the “Sample Activity”.

Oklahoma Bridges

A photographic history of bridges throughout Oklahoma, and some discussions and diagrams of the various kinds of trusses. Especially useful for students working on a balsa-wood bridge for Engineering Day!  The pages “Bridge Design” and “Oklahoma Bridge Types” would be excellent required reading for these students.

http://okbridges.wkinsler.com/

 

 

 

Oklahoma Water Resources

Water is becoming more and more important to Oklahomans.  There are water shortages, legal conflicts over water ownership, climate change and the occasional flood.  All of these and more are reflected in the daily and hourly changes in streamflow in watersheds across the state. This information is readily available and it makes for great discussions and projects on graphing and interpretation of graphs.

What you will find is hourly streamflow, water use, groundwater, maps and other water-related data for dozens of water locations in Oklahoma.  What you won’t find are lesson plans.  This is an area where you can shine by making your own:

http://ok.water.usgs.gov/